endorsements for Groove

My book, Groove: A Phenomenology of Rhythmic Nuance, is just published on Bloomsbury Academic. These four endorsements appear on the back cover:

“For decades, philosophers and theorists of music have been promising an embodied phenomenology of music. Tiger C. Roholt’s Groove is an original and insightful essay that makes good on that promise. Roholt challenges analytic and quantificational approaches to rhythmic nuance and argues that grooves are non-conceptual, felt, and understood through bodily engagement. Full of smart musical examples and sound arguments, Groove is much more than just a book on rhythm or drumming. It is a cornerstone for any future phenomenology of music.”
BRIAN KANE, Associate Professor of Music, Yale University, USA

“Tiger C. Roholt’s energetic new study of a neglected but undeniably central aspect of rhythm represents a major step forward in understanding how and why music moves us as it does. Roholt writes both as a philosopher and as a player, which readers will quickly see is a great advantage on this topic, and he knows the value of examples, many of which are thoroughly absorbing in their own right. Roholt describes the motor-intentional process that actualizes the implicit groove of a song, giving us a new appreciation of the embodied character of this kind of aesthetic experience and the ‘groove-completing’ role of the listener. A wonderfully interesting study.”
GARRY L. HAGBERG, James H. Ottaway Jr. Professor of Philosophy and Aesthetics, Bard College. USA

“Exploring uncharted philosophical territory, Tiger C. Roholt’s smart, thorough account of groove pushes us to rethink the nature of music and musical engagement. Experiencing music is not merely a matter of how it sounds, because how it sounds can be a function of how it feels.”
THEODORE GRACYK, Professor of Philosophy, Minnesota State University Moorhead, USA and author of On Music and co-editor of The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music

“Featuring elegant, lucid, and accessible prose, Groove underscores how musical notions–whether aesthetic, affective, perceptual, or philosophical—can only be explained fully with respect to bodily experience. This imaginative book is challenging, provocative, thoroughly argued, and sparkling with interdisciplinarity.”
CHARLES HIROSHI GARRETT, Associate Professor, Musicology, University of Michigan, USA and editor of The Grove Dictionary of American Music, 2nd ed.